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The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 123movies

The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 123movies

It's the BIGGEST. It's the BEST. It's BOND. And B-E-Y-O-N-D.Jul. 07, 1977125 Min.
Your rating: 0
6 1 vote

Synopsis

Watch: The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 123movies, Full Movie Online – James Bond is back again and his new mission is to find out how a Royal Navy Polaris submarine holding sixteen nuclear warheads simply disappeared while on patrol. Bond joins Major Anya Amasova and takes on a a web-handed mastermind, known as Karl Stromberg, as well as his henchman Jaws, who has a mouthful of metal teeth. Bond must track down the location of the missing submarine before the warheads are fired..
Plot: Russian and British submarines with nuclear missiles on board both vanish from sight without a trace. England and Russia both blame each other as James Bond tries to solve the riddle of the disappearing ships. But the KGB also has an agent on the case.
Smart Tags: #007 #spy_film #secret_service_agent #official_james_bond_series #1970s #action_hero #good_versus_evil #evil_woman #heroine #nobody_does_it_better #shaken_not_stirred #female_nudity #submarine #teeth #egyptian_pyramid #british_secret_service #nuclear_missile #bikini #marine_biologist #cold_war #battle


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Ratings:

7.0/10 Votes: 110,002
81% | RottenTomatoes
55/100 | MetaCritic
N/A Votes: 1597 Popularity: 23.845 | TMDB

Reviews:


Not my favourite outing for “James Bond” this one, perhaps because the opening snow-scape scenes rely too heavily on green screen – maybe Roger Moore didn’t like skiing, or just couldn’t get insured – but in any case he certainly never left Pinewood for the first ten minutes here. It then leads into one of the more preposterous stories in which he must team up with the glamorous Soviet agent “Amasova” (Barbara Bach) to track down what has happened to two nuclear submarines that have vanished. It’s got the usual travelogue elements – we go via Austria, to Egypt before the high seas where we encounter a sort of ecological megalomaniac in “Stromberg” (Curt Jürgens) who is trying to initiate global armageddon so he can live in his city under the sea. To help him achieve his goals, he has engaged the services of toothy strongman “Jaws” (Richard Kiel) who soon presents the couple with some perilous scenarios as they, of course, start to fall for each other. There is a distinct paucity of gadgets in this film, save for the submersible Lotus; the humour is a bit on the tacky side and I felt that the whole thing dragged a bit towards the end. Jürgens does just enough to get by but is hardly menacing; quite how Bach remains contained in her frock towards the end is astonishing and the denouement, though offering plenty of pyrotechnics, was rather rushed and a bit flat. It’s OK, this film – but, sadly, nothing more than that.
Review By: CinemaSerf

Commander James Bond, recruited to the British Secret Service from the Royal Navy. License to kill and has done so on numerous occasions.

The Spy Who Loved Me is directed by Lewis Gilbert and adapted to screenplay by Christopher Wood and Richard Maibaum from the novel written by Ian Fleming. It stars Roger Moore, Barbara Bach, Curt Jurgens, Richard Kiel and Walter Gotell. Music is scored by Marvin Hamlisch and cinematography by Claude Renoir.

Bond 10. Allied and Soviet nuclear submarines are mysteriously disappearing from the waters and causing friction between the nations. MI6 and the KGB have a notion that a third party is responsible and stirring up trouble for their own nefarious means. 007 is partnered with Soviet spy Major Anya Amasova (Agent XXX) and the pair are tasked with getting to the bottom of the plot before the crisis escalates.

During the whole run of the James Bond franchise there have been a few occasions when it was felt it had run out of steam. 1977 and on the back of the mediocre reception and by Bond standards the poor box office return of The Man with the Golden Gun, now was one such time. With producer Albert Broccoli striking out on his own, the stakes were high, but with a determined vision forming in his head and a near $14 million budget to work from courtesy of United Artists, Broccoli went big, and it worked magnificently. The Spy Who Loved Me is Moore’s best Bond film, not necessarily his best Bond performance, but as a movie it’s near faultless, it gets all the main ingredients right. Gadgets and humour were previously uneasy accompaniments to James Bond as a man, but here they serve to enhance his persona, never taking away his tough bastard edge. The suspense and high drama is back, for the first time in a Roger Moore Bond film things are played right, we don’t think we are watching an action comedy, but an action adventure movie, what little lines of humour are here are subtle, not overt and taking away from the dramatic thrust.

For production value it’s one of the best. Brocoli instructed the great Ken Adam to go build the 007 Stage at Pinewood so as to achieve their vision for The Spy Who Loved Me. At the time it became the biggest sound stage in the world. With such space to work from, Adam excels himself to produce the interior of the Liparus Supertanker, the home for a brilliant battle in the final quarter. Vehicles feature prominently, the amphibious Lotus Esprit moved quickly into Bond folklore, rocket firing bikes and mini-subs, helicopter, speedboat, escape pod, wet-bike and on it goes. Then there’s Stromberg’s Atlantis home, a wonderfully War of the Worlds type design for the outer, an underwater aquarium for the inner. Glorious locations are key, also, Egypt, Sardinia, Scotland and the Bahamas are colourful treats courtesy of Renoir’s photography. Underwater scenes also grabbing the attention with some conviction.

The film also features a great cast that are led by a handsome, and in great shape, Moore. Barbara Bach (Triple X) is not only one of the most beautiful Bond girls ever, she’s expertly portraying a femme of substance, intelligent, brave and committed to the cause, she is very much an equal to Bond, and we like that. The accent may be a shaky, but it’s forgivable when judging Bach’s impact on the picture. Jurgens as Stromberg is a witty villain, but he oozes despotic badness, sitting there in his underwater lair deliciously planning to start a new underwater world. Kiel as Jaws, the man with metal teeth, he too moved into Bond folklore, a scary creation clinically realised by the hulking Kiel. Gotell as Gogol is a presence and Caroline Munro as Naomi is memorable, while Bernard Lee’s M and Desmond Llewelyn’s Q get wonderful scenes of worth. They forgot to give poor Moneypenney something to chew on, but in the main it comes over that the makers were reawakened to what made Bond films great in the first place. There’s even a candidate for best title song as well, Nobody Does it Better, delivered so magically by Carly Simon.

The grand vision paid off, handsomely. It raked in just over $185 million at the world box office, some $87 million more than The Man with the Golden Gun. Not bad considering it was up against a record breaking Star Wars. Critics and fans, too, were pleased. It’s not perfect. It’s ironic that director Lewis Gilbert returned for his second Bond assignment, because this does feel like a rehash of his first, You Only Live Twice, only bigger and better. Hamlisch underscores it at times and John Barry’s absence is felt there. While if we are being particularly harsh? Then Stromberg could perhaps have been a more pro-active villain? He makes a telling mark, we know he’s a mad dastard, but he only really sits around giving orders and pushing death dealing buttons. But small complaints that fail to stop this Bond from being one of the best. Hey, we even get an acknowledgement that Bond was once married, and the response from Bond is respectful to that dramatic part of his past. 9/10

Review By: John Chard
Everyone Kind Of Resents Jurgens Marineland Earth He’s Got Planned
Roger Moore as James Bond has got another assignment involving the fate of the whole world. British Intelligence never gives him anything less. This time he’s investigating this disappearance of both British and American nuclear powered submarines while on duty with no trace at all.

The evil genius behind it all is Curt Jurgens playing the role of an Onassis type billionaire shipping magnate who wants the world made to order for him. And in this case he believes mankind should start all over again in an undersea world which of course he will run. Just another case of a guy with all the money in the world thinking that entitles him to decide how everyone else should live and behave. Jurgens has the resources to make it stick unless 007 can do something about it.

With both the Russians and the British working on this, the powers that be which in this case is General Walter Gotell of the Soviet KGB and M of course played by Bernard Lee have decided to stop working against each other. In this case it means Moore working with beautiful Russian agent Barbara Bach and you know of course she’ll be Bondified before the film is over.

Probably up to this point the most dangerous foe that James Bond ever faced was Odd Job in You Only Live Twice. But when Richard Kiel as Jaws made his appearance, he took that title away and retired the crown as far as I’m concerned. That is one menacing dude, 7’2″ with a mouth full of steel teeth that finish off most people. Of course 007 ain’t most people.

The Spy Who Loved Me garnered three Oscar nominations for Best Musical Score for Marvin Hamlisch and for Best Song with Nobody Does It Better for Hamlisch and Carole Bayer Sager and one for Art&Set Direction. I’m not sure, but this might be the most recognition the Motion Picture Academy gave a Bond film.

And this film review is dedicated to Tom Golisano, another megalomaniac billionaire who thinks he ought to be running things. We’re well used to the type in my area.

Review By: bkoganbing

Other Information:

Original Title The Spy Who Loved Me
Release Date 1977-07-07
Release Year 1977

Original Language en
Runtime 2 hr 5 min (125 min), 2 hr 3 min (123 min) (cut) (Sweden)
Budget 14000000
Revenue 185438673
Status Released
Rated PG
Genre Action, Adventure, Thriller
Director Lewis Gilbert
Writer Christopher Wood, Richard Maibaum, Ian Fleming
Actors Roger Moore, Barbara Bach, Curd Jürgens
Country United Kingdom
Awards Nominated for 3 Oscars. 3 wins & 11 nominations total
Production Company N/A
Website N/A


Technical Information:

Sound Mix Mono (35 mm prints, original release), 4-Track Stereo (London premiere print)
Aspect Ratio 2.39 : 1
Camera Arriflex 35-III, Panavision C-Series Lenses, Panavision Panaflex Gold, Panavision C-Series and Cooke Lenses, Panavision Panaflex X, Panavision C-Series Lenses, Panavision Panaflex, Panavision C-Series Lenses
Laboratory DeLuxe, Hollywood (CA), USA
Film Length 3,400 m (Italy)
Negative Format 35 mm (Eastman 100T 5247)
Cinematographic Process Panavision (anamorphic)
Printed Film Format 35 mm

The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 123movies
The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 123movies
The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 123movies
The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 123movies
The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 123movies
The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 123movies
The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 123movies
The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 123movies
The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 123movies
The Spy Who Loved Me 1977 123movies
Original title The Spy Who Loved Me
TMDb Rating 6.8 1,597 votes

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