What's happening?

Video Sources 0 Views Report Error

  • Source 1123movies
  • Source 2123movies
  • Source 3123movies
  • Source 4123movies
  • Source 5123movies
  • Source 6123movies
  • Source 7123movies
  • Source 8123movies
Liberation Day 2016 123movies

Liberation Day 2016 123movies

Oct. 09, 2016100 Min.
Your rating: 0
6 1 vote

Synopsis

Watch: Liberation Day 2016 123movies, Full Movie Online – Under the loving but firm guidance of an old fan turned director and cultural diplomat and to the surprise of a whole world, the ex-Yugoslavian cult band Laibach becomes the first foreign rock group ever to perform in the fortress state of North Korea. Confronting strict ideology and cultural differences, the band struggles to get their songs through the needle’s eye of censorship before they can be unleashed on an audience never before exposed to alternative rock’n’roll. Meanwhile, propaganda loudspeakers are being set up at the border between the two Koreas and a countdown to war is announced. The hills are alive…with the sound of music..
Plot: Under the loving but firm guidance of an old fan turned director and cultural diplomat, and to the surprise of a whole world, the ex-Yugoslavian cult band Laibach becomes the first rock group ever to perform in the fortress state of North Korea.
Smart Tags: N/A


Find Alternative – Liberation Day 2016, Streaming Links:

123movies | FMmovies | Putlocker | GoMovies | SolarMovie | Soap2day


Ratings:

7.6/10 Votes: 856
67% | RottenTomatoes
65/100 | MetaCritic
N/A Votes: 16 Popularity: 1.712 | TMDB

Reviews:

What’s Most Amazing Is This is a Documentary!
Laibach is a band that formed in 1980 in what was then Yugoslavia, now Slovenia, as an art rock project that aimed to fight fascism by wrapping itself in the uniforms and symbols of fascism and using highly militarized sounding beats to obscure its actual anti-fascist agenda. Dangerous enough in Tito’s Yugoslavia, this film suggests that they felt a bit “orphaned” when that country broke up following Tito’s death, but they have continued on writing and performing. Fast forward to 2015, when North Korea celebrates its 70th “Liberation Day,” the day in 1945 when Japan (which had occupied Korea for decades) was finally kicked out of the country, and Kim Jung Il became the first Beloved Leader of the modern age. Why would North Korea invite Laibach to perform at a major theatre in Pyonyang to celebrate that day? Not sure that can be really explained, but it actually did happen, and “Liberation Day” is the documentary about that event. The co- director Morten Traavik had visited North Korea in the past and also directed various Laibach videos, and somehow he managed to set this thing up. The film is really interesting in terms of how the band had to work with North Korean workers to set up their stage and various multimedia inputs that they use in their live shows; but honestly, the very premise of the film – North Korea invites an anti-fascist Western band that fights fascism by emulating it to extremes! – is worth the price of admission on its very own. Oh, and if you don’t know Laibach, check out their version of “Sympathy for the Devil” or “Life is Life” on YouTube to get a flavour of how they might choose to render, oh, for example, the soundtrack for “The Sound of Music” – as they did for this event.
Review By: alisonc-1
A Must-See!
The Slovenian cult band Laibach becomes the first foreign rock group ever to perform in the fortress state of North Korea. Confronting strict ideology and cultural differences, the band struggles to get their songs through the needle’s eye of censorship before they can be unleashed on an audience never before exposed to rock music.

For those not familiar with Laibach, the band is something of a mix between Devo and Rammstein. In fact, Rammstein freely admits that is influenced by Laibach. Their performance art is steeped in fascist and nationalist imagery; apparently, the North Korean government does not understand the meaning of “satire” and this is one reason the band managed to get the dubious honor of playing rather than, say, Aerosmith or the Rolling Stones. In their own words, “We are fascists as much as Hitler was a painter”. Take that however you like.

The biggest question viewers might have is how filmmakers even had access to film inside North Korea. That answer is director Morten Traavik, a Norwegian director and artist who is something of a cultural ambassador to the country. Although this documentary is about Laibach and the censorship of North Korea, the figure of Traavik looms large. This is a man who held multiple beauty pageants for landmine survivors. And, when asked about political oppression, he says (not entirely jokingly), “I live in Sweden now, it’s pretty oppressive. It’s like a Soviet Union made by gay people.” Once inside North Korea, danger seems to lurk around every corner. The band and their crew are warned not to wander off alone; without Traavik, they have no mediator. The people there are openly referred to as “brainwashed” and this is evident from the few people who are interviewed on camera. The Kafa-esque levels of bureaucracy are absurd, with the band not even being made aware of who is handing out censorship decisions or why.

Some of the censorship issues actually raise interesting cultural points. The band considered adding some lyrics in Korean to appeal to their audience, but were then told it was risky because it might sound “South” Korean. The countries have been divided for so long that the languages have almost become distinct due to the tight borders. North Korea speaks the same language it spoke 75 years ago, whereas South Korea has been more open to modifications from outside languages. In such an inter-connected world, any language will naturally adapt words from other cultures. But not North Korea.

The concert included re-interpretations of songs from “The Sound of Music”, which seems subtly subversive considering the film was, of course, about a family fleeing totalitarianism. With all the lyric notes, video edits and other changes the North Korean censors required, it is rather surprising they allowed this to go through. Then again, did the audience fully grasp the symbolism anyway? Any documentary inside North Korea would be fascinating, but it’s the merger of North Korea and a group of individuals like Laibach that raises the film to the level of the absurd. Without a doubt, this is one of the year’s best documentaries and a rare treat where truth is stranger than fiction. “Liberation Day” screens at the Fantasia International Film Festival on July 16, 2017.

Review By: gavin6942

Other Information:

Original Title Liberation Day
Release Date 2016-10-09
Release Year 2016

Original Language en
Runtime N/A
Budget 0
Revenue 0
Status Released
Rated N/A
Genre Documentary, Music
Director Ugis Olte, Morten Traavik
Writer Morten Traavik
Actors Boris Benko, Tomaz Cubej, Milan Fras
Country Latvia, Norway, Slovenia
Awards 5 wins & 1 nomination
Production Company N/A
Website N/A


Technical Information:

Sound Mix N/A
Aspect Ratio N/A
Camera N/A
Laboratory N/A
Film Length N/A
Negative Format N/A
Cinematographic Process N/A
Printed Film Format N/A

Original title Liberation Day
TMDb Rating 7.781 16 votes

Director

Uģis Olte
Director

Cast

Similar titles

Playing with Sharks 2021 123movies
YembiYembi: Unto The Nations 2014 123movies
The Minimalists: Less Is Now 2021 123movies
Hit ‘n Strum 2013 123movies
Secret Space UFOs: Apollo 1-11 2023 123movies
The Painted Warrior 2019 123movies
Holy Ghost Reborn 2015 123movies
Necessary Evil: Super-Villains of DC Comics 2013 123movies
Genesis: Together and Apart 2014 123movies
Love, Deutschmarks and Death 2022 123movies
On Tender Hooks 2013 123movies
New Worlds, The Cradle of Civilization 2021 123movies